Whether it's a special anniversary meal or you are just serving Sunday dinner to you family or guests, Beef Wellington is always the much-anticipated star of the table! My easy Beef Wellington recipe is so simple to make and ready in about an hour and a half. It's perfect for holidays like Christmas and Easter, as well as weekend family dinners!

medium rare beef wellington slice on wooden board with chives and rest of beef wellington.


What is Beef Wellington?

You can almost hear Gordon Ramsay in the back of your mind when you're putting one of his most well-known recipes, Beef Wellington, together. Of course, he didn't invent the dish. According to his website, Beef Wellington was originally made in 1815 celebrating the Duke of Wellington's victory at the Battle of Waterloo.

This 200-year-old recipe is actually fairly easy to put together. I can understand why Ramsay gets upset when it's not made well by the television show contestants. The prep time on this easy Beef Wellington recipe is just around 25-30 minutes! Then the rest of the time is spent either chilling in the fridge or roasting in the oven. I know, just 30 minutes of actual work for something that seems so fancy is not unreasonable at all! I love recipes like this!

We love perfectly cooked medium-rare beef recipes for special occasions and weekend dinners! Our Garlic Herb Butter Beef Tenderloin Roast is a well-loved reader favorite. Or for something a little different, try our Garlic & Herb Roast Boneless Leg of Lamb, which is always a crowd-pleaser!

beef wellington side shot on wooden board

There are 4 layers to Beef Wellington:

  • The beef tenderloin which is seasoned and seared to perfection to retain its juiciness;
  • The duxelles, which is a buttery mushroom paste with onions and thyme;
  • The third layer, prosciutto, gets wrapped over the first 2 layers to keep it all together as well as adding extra flavor and retaining moisture;
  • And finally, everything gets enveloped in a golden, flaky puff pastry layer. Is that my favorite layer? It's so hard to choose - they all taste amazing, and together this dish is rightfully a show stopper!

Beef Wellington is one of those secretly quick and easy dishes that is perfect for holidays like Christmas and Easter, or even Sunday lunches, or anytime you have guests over. You can prep most of it the night before to save time, and then wrap it in puff pastry and bake it the next day before dinner. Kids and adults alike love this dish! Picky eaters don't even realize there are mushrooms in it - our little secret!

I have made this numerous times over the years and am sharing the tips and tricks I have picked up for getting this to turn out perfect the first time, and every time!

beef wellington served on a white plate with salad, garnished with chives and flaky salt.

Best Beef Wellington ingredients

The list of ingredients isn't all that long for any part of the recipe. With a wonderfully flavored cut of meat like beef tenderloin, you want the focus to be on the meat, rather than too much on any other part of the recipe, which is intended to compliment and showcase the tenderness of this premium cut.

BEEF

  • Beef tenderloin: This is the same thing as filet mignon, except in one long roast. It's supremely tender and buttery without marbling, but it requires some special care for it to turn out just right, which is why it works well in this preparation. My beef tenderloin weighed about 2-3 lbs. I trimmed off the silverskin and fat and tied it with butcher's twine every inch or so to help keep the shape while it's being seared.
  • Salt and pepper: Seasoning with all beef, and especially at this stage is essential - we don't want a bland beef wellington!
  • Olive oil: Olive oil helps create a perfect sear on the beef tenderloin.
  • Mustard: Just for a little extra flavor, I brushed the beef tenderloin with dijon mustard after searing while the meat is still warm, something I picked up from Mr. Ramsey himself years ago after watching him berate contestants on Masterchef for getting that step wrong or omitting it entirely.

DUXELLES

  • Mushrooms: You can use many kinds: button, cremini, shiitake, portabello, or a mix of mushrooms. Again, they are chopped so fine and cooked to almost a paste that even the most ardent mushroom-haters don't seem to realize what they are eating unless you tell them. But they add fantastic umami to the finished dish!
  • Butter: Butter adds an amazing rich aroma, and also helps the duxelles become a little more spreadable.
  • Herbs & flavor: I added shallots, garlic, and thyme leaves (about 6 sprigs) to the duxelles to really make the flavor pop, along with some salt and pepper to balance it perfectly.

ASSEMBLY

  • Prosciutto: I used about ¼ pound of prosciutto. This close cousin of bacon helps to hold the mushroom layer to the beef tenderloin so it doesn't all fall apart.
  • Puff pastry: The tenderloin, duxelles, and prosciutto is wrapped in flaky puff pastry. It's so delicious! I've always been tempted to make my own, but so far I just rely on good old Pepperidge Farms from the freezer aisle.
  • Egg: I brushed an egg wash over the puff pastry so it turned beautifully golden. It also helps with sealing the beef wellington after you roll it up!
  • Garnishes: Just a couple to round off this dish! I sprinkled flaky (or coarse) sea salt, such as Maldon or fleur de sel, over the beef wellington along with chives before serving,

How to Make Beef Wellington

Anybody can make Beef Wellington. Seriously. It's one of those dishes that people are intimidated and impressed by, but only uses basic cooking skills like searing and sauteeing (which I will explain just in case you are still feeling daunted!).

PREPARE THE TENDERLOIN.

  1. Trim, tie, and season. Firstly, prepare the beef tenderloin by trimming away the silverskin and fat, if needed, then tie with butcher's twine at 1-inch intervals. Your butcher can do this for you if you request it, which is definitely a time-saver. Season the beef generously all over with salt and pepper, planning on about 1 teaspoon of kosher salt per pound of meat.
  2. Sear. Secondly, heat a large skillet over high heat until smoking hot, then add the olive oil. Once hot, sear the tenderloin on all sides until well-browned, about 2 minutes per side. Don't move the meat around in the pan until you are ready to turn it with tongs so it can get a nice sear on all sides, including the ends. This helps seal in the juices.

3. Brush with mustard. Next, remove the seared tenderloin from the pan and cut off the twine. Brush it on all sides with the dijon mustard while the meat is still warm. Set aside.

MAKE THE DUXELLES.

  1. Pulse the ingredients in a food processor. Firstly, combine half of the mushrooms, shallots, thyme leaves, and garlic in a large food processor and then pulse until mushrooms are finely and evenly chopped, about 10-15 pulses. Repeat this step with the remaining mushrooms, shallots, thyme, and garlic.

2. Melt butter. After that, in the same pan used to sear the tenderloin, heat the butter and olive oil over medium-high heat until melted.
3. Cook the duxelles. Next, add the mushroom mixture to the pan and season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms have released most of their liquid, about 8-10 minutes. Continue to cook the mushroom mixture and 4-5 minutes to brown the mushrooms. Remove from the heat and let cool.

ASSEMBLE THE BEEF WELLINGTON.

  1. Layer the prosciutto and duxelles. On a large piece of plastic wrap (you may want to double layer the plastic wrap), lay out the prosciutto in slightly overlapping layers to form a square that will be large enough to wrap the tenderloin in. Spread the duxelles mixture evenly over the prosciutto, then place the tenderloin on one end.
  2. Roll the tenderloin. Use the plastic wrap to help you roll up the tenderloin in the prosciutto and mushrooms, wrapping it tightly to form a log. Tuck in the ends of the prosciutto as you roll it up. Twist the ends of the plastic wrap closed, then place the tenderloin in the fridge for 30 minutes to help make sure it will all hold together.
  1. Roll the pastry. Lightly dust a clean surface with flour then roll out the thawed puff pastry, pressing the edges together to seal if working with two sheets. It should create a rectangle large enough to wrap the prosciutto-wrapped tenderloin roast.
  2. Wrap the tenderloin in puff pastry. Remove the tenderloin from the plastic wrap, then place it on the puff pastry. Roll it up, tucking the ends under and brushing the beaten egg over the long edge to seal the seam. If you find that you have significant excess pastry along the edges, you may want to trim some of that away.
  1. Brush with egg wash. After it's wrapped in puff pastry, transfer the wrapped beef wellington to a large baking sheet lined with parchment paper, and then Brush the top with the remaining egg wash, then cut diagonal slashes every inch or so down the length of the pastry to allow steam to vent while the beef wellington is baking. Sprinkle with flaky salt or coarse sea salt.
  2. Bake! Bake until golden brown on the outside and the tenderloin reaches 120-125°F (49-51°C) on a digital meat thermometer (affiliate link) for medium-rare doneness. This is typically around 40 to 45 minutes, depending on the size of your tenderloin roast. Remove from the oven and rest for 10 minutes before slicing into thick slices.
  3. Garnish and serve. Finally, serve slices of beef wellington garnished with the fresh minced chives and an additional sprinkling of flaky or coarse salt.
uncut beef wellington on wooden board, sprinkled with flaky salt.

Recipe for Beef Wellington make ahead and storage

Can you store Beef Wellington in the fridge?

Store the cooked dish in an airtight container for up to 4 days in the fridge. You can also freeze it in an airtight freezer container for up to 3 months. Thaw completely before reheating.

To reheat, I place the Beef Wellington in the oven at 350°F until it's heated though. You may want to cover it in aluminum foil if the pastry starts to brown too much.

Can I make Wellington beef ahead of time?

Yes! You can prepare the beef and duxelles, and follow the recipe right up until it's time to add the puff pastry layer. Instead of adding the puff pastry (which may get soggy if you add it now) wrap the beef, duxelles, and prosciutto up in plastic wrap and store it in the fridge after cooling for up to 24 hours. The next day, continue the recipe by rolling out the puff pastry, wrapping up the beef, and baking the Beef Wellington.

What to serve with Beef Wellington

This Beef Wellington is the star of the table! This dish can be saved for special occasions and holidays or served on the weekend at family dinners so the sky's the limit for good sides to pair with the Beef Wellington. We love Roasted Asparagus, Roasted Brussels Sprouts, mashed potatoes, Scalloped Potatoes (Au Gratin Potatoes), Easy Rice Pilaf with Orzo Pasta, Caesar Salad, Oven Roasted Broccoli, Twice Baked Potatoes, French Green Beans, or even Creamy Potluck Potatoes. So many good options!

Best Beef Wellington Recipe FAQs

What does "duxelles" mean in a Beef Wellington recipe?

Duxelles is the French name given to the mushroom mixture which is layered between the beef tenderloin and the prosciutto in this Beef Wellington recipe. It's usually made with mushrooms, onions or shallots, and thyme or parsley plus salt and pepper. It gets cooked in butter which helps turn it into more of a paste, perfect for spreading over the prosciutto.

What is the perfect Beef Wellington temperature?

By using a meat thermometer, the Beef Wellington should read at 135°F for medium-rare, and 150°F for medium.

What cut of beef is best for Beef Wellington?

The best cut of meat for Beef Wellington is a nice beef tenderloin, but you could really make this with a fillet steak or filet mignon if you want to try making smaller, individual beef wellingtons rather than a large one that you slice. These parts of the cow come from the center cut and they are the most juicy and tender parts.

How do you keep Beef Wellington from getting soggy on the bottom?

To prevent a soggy bottom on your Beef Wellington, make sure your duxelle is cooked well to let the mushrooms release all their moisture. Also, the prosciutto will help to act as a barrier to keep the liquids inside. Brushing an egg wash on the inside of the pastry can also help form a barrier while it cooks. And last, don’t forget to cut diagonal slashes every inch or so down the pastry to allow steam to vent while the Wellington is baking. This will prevent a build up of moisture.

overhead shot of beef wellington on white plate, garnished with chives and flaky salt next to salad.

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Beef Wellington

4.98 from 46 votes
Amy Nash
Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 1 hour 10 minutes
Chilling Time 30 minutes
Total Time 2 hours
Course Main Course
Cuisine British
Servings 8 servings
Whether it's a special anniversary meal or you are just serving Sunday dinner to you family or guests, Beef Wellington is always the much-anticipated star of the table! My easy Beef Wellington recipe is so simple to make and ready in about an hour and a half. It's perfect for holidays like Christmas and Easter, as well as weekend family dinners!

Ingredients
  

  • 2-3 pounds center-cut beef tenderloin trimmed of silverskin and fat, then tied with butcher's twine at 1-inch intervals
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 Tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 Tablespoons dijon mustard

Duxelles

  • 1 ½ pounds mushrooms (button, cremini, shiitake, portabello, or a mix cleaned and roughly chopped)
  • 2 Tablespoons salted butter
  • 2 Tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 medium shallots, roughly chopped
  • 2 teaspoons fresh thyme leaves (about 6 sprigs)
  • 4 cloves garlic
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

Assembly

  • 12 thin slices prosciutto (about ¼ pound)
  • Flour for rolling out puff pastry
  • 14 ounces frozen or homemade puff pastry, thawed
  • 1 large egg, beaten
  • ½ teaspoon flaky or coarse sea salt, such as Maldon or fleur de sel
  • 1 bunch finely minced chives

Instructions
 

Prepare the tenderloin.

  • Prepare the beef tenderloin by trimming away the silverskin and fat, if needed, then tie with butcher's twine at 1-inch intervals. Your butcher can do this for you, if you request it. Season generously all over with salt and pepper, planning on about 1 teaspoon of kosher salt per pound of meat.
  • Heat a large skillet over high heat until smoking hot, then add the olive oil. Once hot, sear the tenderloin on all sides until well-browned, about 2 minutes per side. Don't move the meat around in the pan until you are ready to turn it with tongs so it can get a nice sear on all sides, including the ends. This helps seal in the juices.
  • Remove the seared tenderloin from the pan and cut off the twine. Brush it on all sides with the dijon mustard while the meat is still warm. Set aside.

Make the Duxelles.

  • Combine half of the mushrooms, shallots, thyme leaves, and garlic in a large food processor (affiliate link). Pulse until mushrooms are finely and evenly chopped, about 10-15 pulses. Repeat with the remaining mushrooms, shallots, thyme, and garlic.
  • In the same pan used to sear the tenderloin, heat the butter and olive oil over medium-high heat until melted.
  • Add the mushroom mixture and season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms have released most of their liquid, about 8-10 minutes. Continue to cook the mushroom mixture and 4-5 minutes to brown the mushrooms. Remove from the heat and let cool.

Assemble

  • On a large piece of plastic wrap (you may want to double layer the plastic wrap), lay out the prosciutto in slightly overlapping layers to form a square that will be large enough to wrap the tenderloin in. Spread the duxelles mixture evenly over the prosciutto, then place the tenderloin on one end.
  • Use the plastic wrap to help you roll up the tenderloin in the prosciutto and mushrooms, wrapping it tightly to form a log. Tuck in the ends of the prosciutto as you roll it up. Twist the ends of the plastic wrap closed, then place the tenderloin in the fridge for 30 minutes to help make sure it will all hold together.
  • Preheat oven to 425°F (218°C).
  • Lightly dust a clean surface with flour then roll out the thawed puff pastry, pressing the edges together to seal if working with two sheets. It should create a rectangle large enough to wrap the prosciutto-wrapped tenderloin roast.
  • Remove the tenderloin from the plastic wrap, then place on the puff pastry. Roll it up, tucking the ends under and brushing the beaten egg over the long edge to seal the seam. If you find that you have significant excess pastry along the edges, you may want to trim some of that away.
  • Transfer the wrapped beef wellington to a large baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Brush the top with the remaining egg wash, then cut diagonal slashes every inch or so down the length of the pastry to allow steam to vent while the wellington is baking. Sprinkle with flaky salt or coarse sea salt.
  • Bake until golden brown on the outside and the tenderloin reaches 120-125°F (49-51°C) on a digital meat thermometer (affiliate link) for medium-rare doneness. This is typically around 40 to 45 minutes, depending on the size of your tenderloin roast. Remove from the oven and rest for 10 minutes before slicing into thick slices.
  • Serve slices garnished with the fresh minced chives and an additional sprinkling of flaky or coarse salt.

Nutrition

Calories: 826kcal | Carbohydrates: 27g | Protein: 32g | Fat: 66g | Saturated Fat: 22g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 6g | Monounsaturated Fat: 32g | Trans Fat: 1g | Cholesterol: 126mg | Sodium: 593mg | Potassium: 745mg | Fiber: 2g | Sugar: 3g | Vitamin A: 155IU | Vitamin C: 4mg | Calcium: 30mg | Iron: 5mg
Tried this recipe? Show me on Instagram!Mention @HouseOfNashEats or tag #houseofnasheats!

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About the author

Hi, I'm Amy

I enjoy exploring the world through food, culture, and travel and sharing the adventure with mostly from-scratch, family friendly recipes that I think of as modern comfort cooking.

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Reader questions and reviews

  1. 5 stars
    Made this today for Thanksgiving dinner. Turned out great!! Everybody loved it. Took longer to brown the mushrooms than stated in the recipe. Making sure they were browned was key!! Thanks for the great recipe!!

    1. You will need to cook it longer, but I can't say by exactly how much. Start with 10 minutes and check from there. The most important thing is going to be the internal temperature of your meat and covering the puff pastry loosely with foil if it is getting too dark.

  2. 5 stars
    This is my second time making this recipe for BT since the first was such a hit. It’s easy in the sense that nothing is too complicated, but it IS time consuming. That’s why I double up the recipe. I’m currently making one for our holiday dinner and a second that I’ll freeze for a dinner party in January. If you go this route, which I highly recommend, the mushroom mixture takes much longer to release all of the moisture. I’d say about 30 minutes give or take to release the moisture and then brown as instructed. 10/10 will be making this particular recipe for years to come!

  3. 5 stars
    I made this for my in laws for Christmas the recipe was easy to follow the pictures helped a lot it was so delicious everyone loved it!
    I will make this again! Thanks for the recipe!

    1. Not really. It provides a protective barrier against the puff pastry that helps prevent it from getting soggy from the duxelles. Technically you could skip it, but the result might not be quite as good.

  4. Some members of my family don't eat pork. Is there an alternative to the Proscuitto in this Beef Welington recipe?

    1. There is a similar Italian cured meat called beef bresaola that should work well. You can find it at Whole Foods or online as well as a well-stocked deli area of some grocery stores.

  5. This was absolutely amazing! First beef Wellington I have ever made and it was delish! Not super hard. Steps were well written out. Thank you!

  6. Hi! I’m going to try this on Christmas! Is it ok to sear the beef in the AM, refrigerate then make later for dinner?

  7. 5 stars
    Thanks for your wonderful recipes and this is a great one! I need some advice about cooking it longer for family members who won't eat meat that isn't cooked medium well to well done. I'm wondering if you have any tips on how to do this? I'm thinking of cooking two, but don't want the medium well to well done to be super dry either. Any advice? Thanks!

    1. I'm sorry, but unfortunately if you cook this cut of meat to medium-well to well done it will be dry no matter what you do. There's just no getting around it.

  8. 5 stars
    Just placed it in the oven 🫣super excited for this Wellington! First time for everything 🎄Merry Christmas!

  9. I followed this recipe to a T, but my meat was way overcooked. We're talking well-done. It still tasted delicious, so it is no doubt this is a good recipe. Where did I go wrong?

    1. Hmmm I don't know where it went wrong. It could be the cut of meat or your oven cooked at a higher temperature. You can try cooking at a lower temperature for longer. Also, a meat thermometer is also very helpful. That will guarantee a perfect temperature. I am glad you still enjoyed it though!