Smoked Pork Belly Burnt Ends are irresistible, juicy bites of mouthwatering meat (the same kind used to make bacon) that is rubbed in spices, infused with smoky flavor, and tossed in a fabulous barbecue sauce.  Eat them as an appetizer by spearing with toothpicks, or throw them into tacos or salads, onto buns for pork belly sandwiches, or over nachos.  

An image of smoked pork belly burnt ends on a baking sheet.

Smoked Pork Belly Burnt Ends

If you’ve ever been to a barbecue joint before, chances are you’ve seen brisket burnt ends on the menu, along with a note about how the supply is limited and they run out quickly.  That’s because burnt ends are the most flavorful, incredible piece of meat you can think of.  They have this unique quality of having bark (the crusty exterior you get from a long, slow smoke) and a caramelized sauce that makes for sticky, salty, deliciously rich smokey bites.

Pork belly burnt ends are a little different, but similar to brisket burnt ends in a lot of ways.  The important part being that they are incredibly tender and full of flavor.  They practically melt in your mouth.

We make our smoked pork belly using our Traeger grill and it’s incredibly easy to do.  Like most smoked meats I can think of, the key is to cook them low and slow.  It gives time for the fat to melt and render down and for each morsel of cubed pork belly to absorb the amazing smoky flavor from the wood pellets.  

An image of smoked pork belly burnt ends in a sweet honey barbecue sauce.

House of Nash MEATS

For several years now, Paul and I have enjoyed smoking meats on our Traeger smoker.  A few months ago, Paul had a great idea and recommended I do a series devoted to the meats we smoke, called House of Nash MEATS!  

So far I’ve shared Texas smoked brisket, hot smoked salmon, brown sugar & honey baby back ribs, and smoked pulled pork, but it’s possible I’ve saved the best for last with these smoked pork belly burnt ends.  We’ve made these pork belly burnt ends numerous times now, but Paul was originally inspired by this post from Vindulge, along with tips from a number of other sources, when he was learning how to make pork belly burnt ends.

An image of a man putting pork belly on a smoker to make burnt ends.

What is pork belly?

If you aren’t familiar with pork belly, it’s the same cut of meat that bacon is made from.  Pork belly is basically just uncured, non-smoked, unsliced bacon.  It comes from the belly of the pig (not the stomach, but rather the piece of flesh on the underside of the pig), and it is made from layers of fat and meat.  

Even if your local grocery store doesn’t have pork belly on display, I have found that they often have it in the back if you ask the butcher.  Look for a piece of pork belly with as much meat as possible.

Pork belly is unique because it is one of the only proteins that can be cut into small bites and smoked like this.  The layers of fat in the pork belly allow it to stay moist and not dry out during the long, slow smoke.

An image of cubes of pork belly that has been smoked on a Traeger grill and covered in barbecue sauce. An image of a hand picking up a cube of smoked pork belly burnt ends.

What kind of wood should I use to smoke Pork Belly Burnt Ends?

We like to use cherry wood for smoking our pork belly burnt ends.  I’ve also read that hickory, pecan, maple, and pretty much any of the fruit woods like apple or peach are good choices for this cut of meat, but we haven’t tried them yet.  

How to make pork belly to make burnt ends

  1. Trim off the skin and top layer of fat.  You can ask the butcher to trim the skin for you, but you run the risk of them taking off quite a lot of the top layer of fat.  We do like to trim off the fat on top when it is pretty thick, but some people love the fat and like to leave most of it on.  A lot of it will render off anyway.  You don’t want to trim it all away, but our preference is to trim some, if not most, of the areas of pure fat away.  To do this, just use a very sharp knife to make gashes horizontally across the top of the piece of pork belly, peeling away the top layer of skin and fat as you go.
  2. Cut the meat into cubes.  Aim for 1 1/2 inch cubes of pork belly.  They might seem large, but they will shrink quite a bit as they cook, just like bacon.  By the time they are done, your pork belly burnt ends will be perfectly bite-size.  If the pork belly is too slippery to slice easily, try sticking it in the freezer for 30 minutes so the fat can firm up a bit, then slice it.
  3. Rub the meat with dry rub.  Drizzle the cubed pork belly with a little olive oil, then sprinkle generously with your favorite pork rub.  Try to cover every piece of pork belly evenly with the rub, then arrange them on a wire cooling and baking rack.  This makes it easy to get the cubes of meat on and off the grill and it also allows better smoke circulation than putting the pork belly in a pan for the initial smoke. 
  4. Smoke between 225°F and 250°F for 2 1/2 to 3 hours until dark red and a nice bark starts to form.  
  5. Sauce the meat.  Transfer the pork belly cubes to a disposable aluminum pan and add BBQ sauce, butter, and honey, stirring to evenly coat the cubes of pork belly.  This will create a braising liquid that will give the sticky sweetness that is characteristic of smoked pork belly burnt ends.  Cover the pan with foil, then return the sauced pork belly to the smoker and cook for another 60 to 90 minutes, until the meat reaches 200°F to 205°F when a digital meat thermometer is inserted into the middle of one of the burnt ends.  Really though, the easiest way to really tell if the pork belly burnt ends are done is to test them with a toothpick.  If it goes in and comes out easily, the burnt ends are done.  
  6. Remove the foil and cook for another 15 minutes to let the sauce thicken up a bit, then remove the pork belly burnt ends from the smoker and serve.
  7. Leftovers warm up really well the next day.  You can even freeze the finished burnt ends, then reheat in the oven and they will still taste delicious!

An image of a piece of pork belly being trimmed of the skin and some of the fat. An image of cubes of pork belly on a cutting board.  An image of pork belly on a Traeger smoker grill. An image of smoked pork belly burnt ends.

More Great Appetizer Recipes For Folks Who Love Burnt Ends

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Smoked Pork Belly Burnt Ends
Yield: 12 servings

Smoked Pork Belly Burnt Ends

Smoked Pork Belly Burnt Ends are irresistible, juicy bites of mouthwatering meat (the same kind used to make bacon) that is rubbed in spices, infused with smoky flavor, and tossed in a fabulous barbecue sauce.  Eat them as an appetizer by spearing with toothpicks, or throw them into tacos or salads, onto buns for pork belly sandwiches, or over nachos.  

Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 4 hours
Total Time 4 hours 10 minutes

Ingredients

  • 4-5 pounds pork belly
  • 2-3 tablespoons olive oil

Rub

  • 1/4 cup brown sugar
  • 1/4 cup kosher salt
  • 1 tablespoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 tablespoon paprika
  • 1 teaspoon chili powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon onion powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper

Sauce

  • 1/2 to 1 cup of your favorite BBQ sauce
  • 4 tbsp butter
  • 1/3 cup honey

Instructions

  1. Trim off the skin and top layer of pure fat of the pork belly.  Cut the meat into 1 1/2-inch cubes.
  2. Rub the meat with a drizzle of olive oil, then combine the rub ingredients and sprinkle generously over the meat, rubbing it in to cover each piece. 
  3. Arrange the pork belly cubes on a wire cooling and baking rack, then place on the smoker and smoke between 225°F and 250°F for 2 1/2 to 3 hours until dark red and a nice bark starts to form.  
  4. Transfer the pork belly cubes to a disposable aluminum pan and add BBQ sauce, butter, and honey, stirring to evenly coat the cubes of pork belly. 
  5. Cover with foil, then return the sauced pork belly to the smoker and cook for another 60 to 90 minutes, until the meat reaches 200°F to 205°F when a digital meat thermometer is inserted into the middle of one of the burnt ends or until a toothpick inserted into the burnt ends goes in and comes out easily.  
  6. Remove the foil and cook uncovered for another 15 minutes to let the sauce thicken up a bit, then remove the pork belly burnt ends from the smoker and serve.

Nutrition Information:

Yield:

12

Serving Size:

1

Amount Per Serving: Calories: 703 Total Fat: 48g Saturated Fat: 18g Trans Fat: 1g Unsaturated Fat: 28g Cholesterol: 169mg Sodium: 2816mg Carbohydrates: 22g Fiber: 1g Sugar: 19g Protein: 44g

HAVE YOU TRIED THIS RECIPE?

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