Grandma Nash’s Best Butter Almond English Toffee recipe is one to be handed down through generations.  The crunchy, buttery toffee and toasted almonds with a thick layer of chocolate makes this one of our favorite candies and a Christmas tradition that we love to share with friends & neighbors!

Grandma Nash's Best Butter Almond English Toffee is one to be handed down through generations. The crunchy, buttery toffee and toasted almonds with a thick layer of chocolate makes this one of our favorite candies and a Christmas tradition that we love to share with friends & neighbors!

For the past few years, I have made 8 or more batches of this fabulous butter almond English toffee to go on plates of goodies (along with this Rocky Road Fudge) that we take around to friends and neighbors in our area, along with Christmas cards.

And I always make a batch to be lovingly packaged up and shipped off to Paul’s grandma (our girls’ great-grandma), from whom this recipe comes.  She is in her 90’s now and no longer makes her famous toffee herself, so I have taken over making it for her and making sure she has a supply to share with her friends who come to visit during December.  This toffee always reminds us of Grandma Nash, along with her creamy apricot pork chops and poppy seed dressing.

Grandma Nash's Best Butter Almond English Toffee is one to be handed down through generations. The crunchy, buttery toffee and toasted almonds with a thick layer of chocolate makes this one of our favorite candies and a Christmas tradition that we love to share with friends & neighbors!

Even though you could technically make this butter almond english toffee recipe without a candy thermometer, I highly recommend investing in a good one.  They aren’t too expensive and it’s a great stocking stuffer for anyone who might like to cook but hasn’t done much candy-making!  And it almost makes toffee-making a foolproof endeavor since all you have to do is get the toffee up to the right temperature.

An image of a pan full of the best english toffee recipe in the world, coated in chocolate and toasted almonds.

Paul’s Grandma Madge clipped the recipe for this Butter Almond English Toffee from the San Jose Mercury Newspaper in 1962 and she made multiple batches of it every year after that.  Her toffee is famous in the Nash family, so one Christmas a few years back I asked her if I could get a copy of her recipe so that I could learn to make it since we don’t live close by and Paul always raved about her toffee.

She pulled out a box of recipe cards and had the original newspaper clipping taped to a card with her handwritten notations “Delicious ’62” and “Christmas Candies” over the top, along with recipes for “Creamy Caramels” and “No-Bake Holiday Orange Balls”.

I haven’t tried either of the other two recipes from those newspaper clippings, but can attest to this “Butter Almond Toffee” being particularly delicious.  The only change I have made is to double the amount of chocolate called for in the original recipe.  And I can’t imagine who is going to complain about an adjustment like that.  I also rewrote the instructions a bit to include some steps that I have found helpful.

Grandma Nash's Best Butter Almond English Toffee is one to be handed down through generations. The crunchy, buttery toffee and toasted almonds with a thick layer of chocolate makes this one of our favorite candies and a Christmas tradition that we love to share with friends & neighbors!

Grandma Nash is such a wonderful, interesting lady.  She goes by her middle name, Madge, instead of Gwendolyn, which is her first name.  My dad does the same thing so when our Rose was born, we decided to do the same for her and have her go by her middle name as a nod to each of them.

Grandma Nash was born in Mona, Utah in December, 1924 but raised her family in San Jose, California.  Paul grew up in the house next door to her and she was his piano teacher, as well as teaching 4th grade at an elementary school for decades.  She is still really sharp and loves to discuss books and politics (she’s a staunch democrat) and classical music.  And she makes the best toffee ever. [UPDATE: Grandma Nash passed away in 2017 but her memory lives on in many ways, the least of which is her wonderful toffee recipe.]

An image of broken up homemade english toffee covered in toasted almonds and semi-sweet chocolate. An image of homemade toffee with almonds and chocolate, broken up into pieces on a baking sheet.

I have used a large pot and quadrupled the recipe with great success, since I usually make between 8-12 batches.  I still divide the chocolate and almond into separate bowls, and pour the toffee out into individual baking sheets to set, but I cook all four batches at the same time with no problem.

How to Make English Toffee

  1. First, toast whole almonds in a 350 degree oven by spreading them in a single layer on a baking sheet and roasting for 10 to 15 minutes.  Chop the cooled almonds into small pieces and set aside.
  2. Butter a baking sheet and sprinkle with half of the chopped almonds.
  3. Melt the butter in a heavy-bottomed pan, then add sugar and water, stirring to combine using a long-handled wooden spoon and bringing to a boil over medium-high heat until a candy thermometer reaches 300 degrees (hard crack stage), usually between 10-15 minutes.
  4. Remove the candy from the heat and immediately stir in the baking soda.  Immediately pour the hot candy over the almonds in the prepared baking sheet and spread out into a thin layer; then sprinkle with chopped chocolate. The heat of the toffee will melt the chocolate which you can then spread out evenly with the back of spatula or knife.
  5. Sprinkle the remaining chopped almonds over the melted chocolate. Let the toffee cool completely and the chocolate re-harden and set, before breaking the toffee pieces.

Grandma Nash's Best Butter Almond English Toffee is one to be handed down through generations. The crunchy, buttery toffee and toasted almonds with a thick layer of chocolate makes this one of our favorite candies and a Christmas tradition that we love to share with friends & neighbors!  Grandma Nash's Best Butter Almond English Toffee is one to be handed down through generations. The crunchy, buttery toffee and toasted almonds with a thick layer of chocolate makes this one of our favorite candies and a Christmas tradition that we love to share with friends & neighbors!

Tips for the Best English Toffee Recipe in the World

Yes, I’m serious, this really is the BEST.  I know it’s a bold claim, but I think it’s the addition of the baking soda which changes the texture just enough to make it really truly amazing.

You want to make sure that this butter almond English toffee is completely set before breaking it into pieces.  I find that it is easiest to let the toffee set overnight, then use a butter knife to jab firmly down into the toffee, which cracks apart into scrumptious buttery, chocolatey, almond covered shards.

While the recipe calls for semisweet chocolate, I have used milk chocolate in the past instead and it is also delicious.  Totally go with whatever is your personal preference.

Grandma Nash's Best Butter Almond English Toffee is one to be handed down through generations. The crunchy, buttery toffee and toasted almonds with a thick layer of chocolate makes this one of our favorite candies and a Christmas tradition that we love to share with friends & neighbors!

I’m so glad to have this cherished butter almond English toffee recipe in my collection, along with my mom’s Chicken Cordon Bleu and my aunt Becky’s Black Forest Cake.  I’m sure your family will love it as much as ours does!

More Homemade Candy Recipes that make Great Edible Gifts

Grandma Nash's Best Butter Almond English Toffee
Yield: 12 people

Grandma Nash's Best Butter Almond English Toffee

Grandma Nash's Best Butter Almond English Toffee is one to be handed down through generations.  The crunchy, buttery toffee and toasted almonds with a thick layer of chocolate makes this one of our favorite candies and a Christmas tradition that we love to share with friends & neighbors!

Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 15 minutes
Total Time 25 minutes

Ingredients

  • 1 cup roasted almonds, chopped
  • 1 cup butter
  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • 1/3 cup brown sugar
  • 2 tablespoons water
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 cup semi-sweet chocolate (about 6 ounces), finely chopped
  • Candy thermometer

Instructions

  1. To toast the almonds, preheat oven to 350 degrees. Spread whole almonds in a single layer on a baking sheet and roast 10-15 minutes, until fragrant and toasted, but being careful not to burn them. Let cool, then chop into small pieces and set aside.
  2. Butter a baking sheet or silipat mat, then sprinkle half of the chopped almonds on the buttered surface and set aside.
  3. In a heavy pan over medium-high heat, melt the butter, then add both types of sugar and the water. Stir to combine using a long-handled wooden spoon and bring to a boil over medium-high heat, stirring constantly. Continue stirring until a candy thermometer reaches 300 degrees (hard crack stage), usually between 10-15 minutes.
  4. Remove from heat and immediately stir in the baking soda, working quickly. The toffee will bubble and foam a bit when reacting to the baking soda. Immediately pour the hot candy over the almonds in the prepared baking sheet and spread out into a thin layer with the back of your stirring spoon; let cool slightly for 2-3 minutes before sprinkling the chopped chocolate over the toffee. The heat of the candy will melt the chocolate after just a few minutes and then you can spread it out into an even layer with the back of spatula or knife.
  5. Sprinkle the remaining chopped almonds over the melted chocolate and press down lightly with the back of a clean spoon. Let the toffee cool completely and the chocolate re-harden and set, then break into pieces.

Notes

Chocolate chips work just fine if you don't have a bar of semi-sweet chocolate.

Nutrition Information:

Yield:

12

Amount Per Serving: Calories: 376 Saturated Fat: 13g Cholesterol: 41mg Sodium: 184mg Carbohydrates: 32g Fiber: 2g Sugar: 28g Protein: 3g

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