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Cookies and Cream Macarons are made with crushed Oreos in the macaron shells and a cookies & cream ganache filling in the center. It’s an American twist on a classic French treat!

We are slightly macaron-obsessed, especially after visiting Paris with our kids. Some of our other favorite flavors are Pistachio Macarons, Raspberry Macarons, and Chocolate Macarons!

A stack of three cookies and cream macarons.

Ooh-la-la Oreo Macarons!

Cookies and cream macarons are the tasty little cookie you didn’t know you needed. With all of your favorite flavors of Oreo cookies and the creamy filling inside, you know this macaron recipe is going to be good!

With melt-in-your-mouth macaron shells and a rich, creamy filling, macarons are a very popular dessert. But add in classic crushed Oreo cookies and you have a macaron flavor that is to die for! This is such a fun variation to add to your repertoire of macaron flavors!

Cookies and cream macarons and Oreos arranged in a circle on a plate set on a black and white napkin.

What Are Macarons?

Macaron cookies are a delicate cookie shell most typically made from ground almonds, egg whites, and sugar, sandwiched around a soft filling like buttercream, ganache, or jam. They’re a French delicacy and pretty pricey. You can make an entire batch of macarons at home for about as much as the cost of two of them at most places.

Oreos and cookies & cream macarons with bites taken out of them on a white surface next to a black and white napkin.

How to Make Cookies and Cream Macarons

Sifting. My first key to macaron success to is sift the almond flour, powdered sugar, and crushed Oreos together TWICE through a fine mesh sieve. Not only does this help lighten the mixture and evenly combine the ingredients, but it also gets rid of larger bits of almond meal.

For me, this is the most tedious part of making macarons. It can take a while to sift everything, but it’s one of my best tips for perfect macarons on your first try.

Almond flour, crushed Oreos, and powdered sugar being sifted through a fine mesh sieve into a glass bowl.

Beat the egg whites. In a large, clean bowl, beat aged egg whites on medium speed until they are frothy, about 1 minute. I always use my KitchenAid with a whisk attachment for this part of things, but you could do it with a hand mixer instead.

I’ve had the best, most consistent success with macarons when I use aged egg whites, although I don’t think they are totally necessary. To age egg whites, separate the whites and yolks, then put the whites in the fridge overnight. The next day, let them sit out on the counter for 1-2 hours before making the macarons.

Honestly, I don’t always have time for this and will sometimes skip the overnight period in the fridge, but I always let the egg whites sit out for 1-2 hours so they really are room temperature at the very least.

Gradually add in the granulated sugar, about 1 tablespoon at a time, whisking for 20 seconds or so after each addition, until all of the sugar has been added. Continue to whisk on medium to medium-high speed until stiff peaks form.

Don’t overbeat the egg whites (which is why I don’t recommend upping your speed any higher than medium-high) but definitely whisk until when you stop the mixer, the egg whites have a lot of volume and will hold their shape when you lift the beaters out.

Fold in the almond flour mixture. Some people recommend adding the sifted ingredients 1/3 at a time, but I always just dump it all in and start folding with a sturdy spatula. By “folding” the almond mixture into the stiff egg whites, I mean using the spatula to scrape the stuff at the bottom of the bowl and lift it up on top, repeating until you get a good “lava” consistency. It’s sort of a “j-shape” motion and this part is technically referred to as “macronage”.

Almond flour and crushed Oreo mixture being added to stiff egg whites in a glass bowl.

You will know you have mixed it enough when a thick ribbon of batter flows off your spatula when you hold it up over the bowl. The batter should melt in on itself after about 10 seconds. If it falls off in blobs, you haven’t mixed long enough. If it falls off in a stream and immediately melts in on itself like honey or shampoo, there’s a chance you went too far and overmixed it.

Honestly, this step is where most people experience the most trepidation when making macarons for the first time, but don’t let that stop you! I taught a group of 9 teenagers how to make macarons with this technique and every one of them had perfect macaron shells with feet (the ruffly looking edges at the bottom of each macaron shell that are the hallmark of excellent macarons) on their very first try.

Macaron batter with a figure eight swirl in it.

Pipe the macaron shells. Line two baking sheets with parchment paper or silicone baking mats. Some people like to trace 1 1/2″ circles on the backside of the parchment paper as a guide for piping, and you can even buy special macaron silpat mats for this purpose, but I always just freeform it because that’s how I roll. But either way it’s important not to pipe these directly onto your baking sheets or they will stick.

Transfer the macaron batter to a piping bag fitted with a large round tip. Or just put it in a large heavy-duty ziploc bag and cut off one corner. Pipe 1 1/2″ circles a couple inches apart on the paper or mat. Then rap the baking sheet on the counter a few times to help remove any air bubbles in the shells. You can poke air bubbles that form on top with a toothpick if you need to.

Let the macarons dry for 30-60 minutes at room temperature. This part is key to getting those “feet” I mentioned earlier. Leaving the macarons out lets the top dry out a bit. I find I often need to open the windows in my house a bit so that a helpful cross-draft can move this part along. You should be able to touch the tops of the macarons without any of it coming off on your finger before they go into the oven. They will feel tacky, but not sticky. If they are still sticky, they haven’t dried enough and you need to wait a little bit longer and maybe place them somewhere where air can circulate around them a bit.

Preheat oven and bake. Let the oven preheat for a good 20 minutes at 300 degrees F, then bake one tray of macaron shells at a time for 16-18 minutes. Let the macaron shells cool completely on the baking sheet before attempting to remove them from the baking mats or parchment paper.

Make white chocolate Oreo ganache filling. While the macaron shells are baking, heat some heavy cream in a microwave-safe bowl and heat for 60 seconds. Pour this over high quality chopped white chocolate or white chocolate chips in a bowl and let them sit for 5 minutes before stirring until completely melted. You may need to heat this in the microwave for another 15 seconds if the white chocolate doesn’t melt all the way. Stir in some crushed Oreos, then stick this in the fridge or freezer until it has cooled completely.

Spoon the ganache filling into a piping bag, then pipe a small amount on the bottom side of one shell. Sandwich another shell on top to complete the macaron. Ideally, macarons are best the day after they are made, but I can never wait that long.

A plate of macarons with Oreo cookies.

Are Cookies and Cream Macarons Gluten Free?

Unfortunately, no. These macarons are not gluten free because they use Oreos, which are not gluten free. That said, you could probably swap out the Oreos for a gluten free variety and have this recipe turn out okay. I haven’t tried it myself, but if you do, I would love to hear your experience in the comments below!

Cookies and cream macarons on a plate with Oreos.

What Happens if You Overmix Macarons?

Now, before you go fretting and talking yourself out of trying macarons if you are a novice, know that it’s honestly not as difficult as so many recipes make it seem. In fact, it’s really not that difficult if you read through the instructions first so you know the common mishaps.

A big one that many people make is overmixing the macaron batter the first time they make macarons. If you overmix your macaron batter then they won’t turn out right. The batter will be too runny, resulting in too much spreading and cookies that may be hollow after baking process or not even have “feet”, which are the ruffly base of each cookie that are the hallmark of quality macarons.

A stack of three cookies and cream macarons with Oreo filling.

Can You Make Macarons on a Rainy Day?

Believe it or not, you should probably avoid making these cookies on humid or wet days. The humidity in the room will cause the cookies to not turn out correctly. The tops may crack and they may not even rise properly. The few times my macarons have failed completely have all been on rainy days.

It’s possible to still make macarons in humid situations using fans or maybe a barely warmed oven to dry them out slightly before baking, but I’m not expert enough yet to guide you on those techniques.

French macarons with bites taken out of some of them next to Oreos.

More Macaron Recipes You’ll Love

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stacked cookies and cream macarons
Yield: 22-24 Macarons

Cookies and Cream Macarons

Cookies and Cream Macarons are made with crushed Oreos in the macaron shells and a cookies & cream ganache filling in the center. It's an American twist on a classic French treat!

Prep Time 2 hours
Cook Time 15 minutes
Total Time 2 hours 15 minutes

Ingredients

Shells

  • 1 cup (100 g) almond flour
  • 1/4 cup (30 g) finely crushed Oreo cookie crumbs (about 4 Oreo cookies with filling removed)
  • 3/4 cup (100 g) powdered sugar
  • 3 egg whites (100 g), room temperature
  • 1/2 cup granulated sugar

Filling

  • 1 1/3 cups white chocolate chips
  • 1/3 cup heavy cream
  • 6 Oreos, finely crushed (with or without filling)

Instructions

  1. Prepare two baking sheets by lining them with parchment paper or silicone baking mats.
  2. Sift almond flour, powdered sugar, and crushed Oreos through a fine mesh sieve into a bowl. Repeat one more time to make sure the ingredients are uniformly combined, discarding any larger pieces that don't go through the mesh sieve. Set aside.
  3. In a large bowl, beat the egg whites on medium speed until frothy, about 1 minute, then slowly add the granulated sugar, about 1 tablespoon every 20 seconds or so. Increase the speed to medium-high then continue to beat until stiff peaks form.
  4. Add the sifted almond/Oreo mixture to the stiff egg whites and begin to fold them in by mixing with a spatula from the bottom of the bowl and lifting it up to drop onto the top of the mixture. Continue to pull the spatula through the mixture by hand, lifting and dropping in a j-shaped folding motion until the mixture begins to loosen and reaches a consistency similar to flowing lava. If you lift a spatula fill of batter from the bowl, it should drizzle off in a thick ribbon and melt in on itself within about 10 seconds. If it falls off in blobs, rather than a ribbon, keep mixing the batter. You should be able to make 1 or 2 figure-eight patterns with the ribbon of batter. If the mixture immediately melts in on itself like honey or shampoo, then you have probably mixed a bit too far.
  5. Transfer the macaron batter to a pastry bag fitted with a large round piping tip. Or use a large heavy-duty ziploc bag with one corner cut off. Pipe the macarons into 1 1/2" circles on the prepared parchment or silicone-lined baking sheets, spacing them a couple inches apart. When the trays are filled, rap them a few times on the counter to help remove air bubbles from the shells, then let them sit out for 30-60 minutes until the tops are dry to the touch and don't stick to your finger.
  6. Preheat oven to 300 degrees F. Bake one sheet of macaron shells at a time for 16-18 minutes. Cool completely on the baking sheet before attempting to remove the macaron shells from the pan.
  7. Meanwhile, make the ganache by combining the white chocolate chipsin a medium bowl. Heat the cream in a microwave-safe bowl for 1 minute, then pour over the white chocolate and let it sit for 5 minutes without stirring. Stir well and reheat in short 15-second bursts in the microwave until fully melted and smooth, if needed. Stir in crushed Oreo crumbs, then refrigerate for 30 minutes until thickened enough to pipe into the macaron shells.
  8. To fill the macaron shells, transfer the Oreo white chocolate ganache to a bag fitted with a small round tip or a ziploc bag with one corner cut off. Pipe enough to fill the centers of half of the macaron shells. Match with the remaining macaron shells.

Notes

  • Aging egg whites: I've had the best, most consistent success with macarons when I use aged egg whites. To do this, separate the whites and yolks, then put the whites in the fridge overnight. The next day, let them sit out on the counter for 1-2 hours before making the macarons. I don't always have time for this and will sometimes skip the overnight period in the fridge, but I always let the egg whites sit out for 1-2 hours so they really are room temperature at the very least.
  • Freezing and storage: Store in an airtight container on the counter for 3 days or in the fridge for 1-2 weeks. These can even be frozen for up to 3 months. Thaw overnight in the fridge before enjoying.

Nutrition Information:

Yield:

22

Serving Size:

1

Amount Per Serving: Calories: 127Total Fat: 5gSaturated Fat: 3gTrans Fat: 0gUnsaturated Fat: 2gCholesterol: 6mgSodium: 34mgCarbohydrates: 18gFiber: 0gSugar: 12gProtein: 2g