This Homemade Pierogi (or is it Pierogies?) recipe is easier to make than you might think and super delicious. I mean, carbs (mashed potatoes) wrapped in carbs (homemade pasta dough) then fried crispy in butter and served with caramelized onions? Yes please!

If you love classic comfort food like these homemade Polish dumplings, be sure to try our Best Ground Beef Stroganoff RecipeChicken Noodle & Dumpling Soup, and Chicken Spaghetti Casserole!

An image of homemade pierogies on a plate with chives and sour cream.

Homemade Pierogi Recipe

I'm visiting the great state of Illinois on my trip around the U.S. in my American Eats series. It's an ongoing project where I am making and sharing some of the favorite foods of each state, one state at a time!

And pierogi, which are Polish in origin, are definitely a popular recipe in Illinois, which has a large population of people who descended from Polish immigrants.

Anyone who has ever made homemade pierogies knows that they are a labor-intensive dish. It helps to have a crew and to make a bunch of them at a time, freezing extras for future use.

Because anyone who has ever EATEN pierogi can tell you that the labor is well spent because they are a delicious taste of savory goodness that can’t be matched anywhere else!

This homemade pierogi recipe does require some work, but the end results are worth it!

An image of crispy fried potato pierogi on a plate.

What is a pierogi?

A pierogi is a small filled dumpling that is cooked in boiling water, then frequently pan-fried so they are crispy.

Pierogi filling is usually sweet or savory with the more popular options being potato or cheese, although sauerkraut is a favorite as well.

Then they can be served with caramelized onions and sour cream. Or at least, that's how we like them. I've also seen pierogi used in a casserole with sliced kielbasa to make an even more filling dish.

An image of homemade polish dumplings with sour cream on the side.

Pierogi dough is an unleavened dough that is essentially a pasta dough. You could buy a pierogi press to cut and seal the individual pierogi, but I think it's almost just as easy to do it by hand. 

Pierogi are so well-loved that many people are opting to buy a bag of frozen pierogis from the grocery store (like Mrs. T pierogies) simply because it cuts down on a lot of the time and mess, especially if you’re making a pierogi casserole when you need quite a lot of them to make the dish. 

But when you know how to make this homemade pierogi recipe and how to cook pierogies, then why not? Homemade from-scratch pierogies definitely taste so much better and you can fill them however you want. 

What are Pierogies made of?

Dough

  • Eggs
  • Sour Cream
  • Flour Salt
  • Baking Powder

Potato Filling

  • Chopped Onion
  • Butter
  • Cold Mashed Potatoes
  • Salt
  • White Pepper

Finishing the Pierogi

  • Melted butter
  • Sour cream for serving
An image of hand-shaped homemade potato pierogies on a plate.

How to make this Homemade Pierogies Recipe

How to make Pierogi Dough

  1. In a large bowl, beat the eggs and the sour cream until smooth.
  2. In a separate bowl, whisk the flour, salt, and baking powder together. Add in the eggs and the sour cream, stirring until the dough starts to come together.
  3. Turn the dough out onto a clean surface and then knead it until smooth. Cover the dough with a damp cloth and then let it rest for 20 minutes. It can even be refrigerated for up to 48 hours.
  4. Divide the dough in half and roll out to ⅛" thickness on a lightly floured surface. Cut into circles with a 3-inch round biscuit cutter.
  5. Make the filling by melting the butter in a small pan. Add in the chopped onion and saute for 5-7 minutes until soft. Add in the onions to the mashed potatoes, stirring to combine.
  6. Place about 1 ½ teaspoons of the filling in the middle of each round of dough. Use your finger to moisten the edges around half of each round with water, then fold over and seal the edges well by pressing them with your fingers or crimping with a fork.
  7. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add in the pierogies, about 10-15 at a time. Cook for 2-3 minutes, until the pierogi float to the top. Remove the cooked pierogi from the water with a slotted spoon and then transfer them to a plate. Drizzle with 2 tablespoons of the melted butter so that they don't stick to each other while you boil the remaining pierogi.
  8. Heat a large skillet over medium-high heat and add in any remaining butter. Fry the pierogi in batches for 2-3 minutes on each side until golden brown. Serve with sour cream.

A collage of images showing how to make pierogi

Homemade Pierogi storage

You can store your cooked pierogi in the fridge in an airtight container for two to three days. Pierogies freeze exceptionally well, raw or baked. Just store them in the freezer in a container or freezer bag for up to four months. When ready to eat raw frozen pierogies, just pop them in the boiling water and fry them. Cooked frozen pierogies will just need to be fried in a frying pan with butter. Just a tip, it’s best not to freeze raw pierogies with raw meat. They don’t reheat as well.

Can You Refrigerate Pierogi Dough?

The dough from this pierogi dough recipe can be kept in the fridge for a day if you make it in advance. This is a great way to make dinner a little faster on the day that you want to assemble and eat them. 

What to serve with Pierogi

Because of the savory sweetness of these little dumplings, it can be hard to think of side dishes to serve alongside them. Consider roasted vegetables like roasted Brussel sprouts, carrots, or cauliflower as those all go great with sweet and savory dishes. Serving your pierogi with a nice salad is another great option.

What is the traditional way to eat pierogies?

Pierogies are traditionally topped with bacon or fried onions and dipped in sour cream. You can sprinkle some fresh herbs like chives to give it a nice bit of color and flavor.

Homemade Pierogi Recipe FAQs

Is it better to cook Pierogies with butter or olive oil?

Honestly, it’s based on your preference whether you want butter or olive oil. Some people like butter, some people like oil. You can even do a combination of both oil and butter. Either way, they will fry up nicely.

What's the difference between gnocchi and pierogies?

Pierogies are basically dumplings filled with potatoes, cheese, sauerkraut and boiled then fried to create a crispy outer shell. Gnoccho is an Italian pasta that is made of a potato dough and then boiled. While both contain potatoes, they are actually quite different and have very different flavors.

Are Pierogies Russian or Polish?

Pierogies are part of Polish culture. It is actually Poland’s national dish and have been around since the 13th century.

Why are my Pierogies tough?

You want to make sure your dough is kneaded well and nice and soft. When cooking the pierogies, don’t underboil but also don’t over boil. Boil for 3-5 minutes until they float to the top and are puffy.

An image of homemade pierogies that have been fried in butter until crispy.

More Recipes Like This One:

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Let me know what you thought with a comment and rating below. You can also take a picture and tag me on Instagram @houseofnasheats or share it on the Pinterest pin so I can see.

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Best Pierogi Recipe

4.50 from 2 votes
Amy Nash
Prep Time 25 minutes
Cook Time 15 minutes
Total Time 40 minutes
Course Main Course
Cuisine American
Servings 3 -4 Dozen
These Homemade Pierogi are easier to make than you might think and super delicious. I mean, carbs (mashed potatoes) wrapped in carbs (homemade pasta dough) then fried crispy in butter and served with caramelized onions? Yes please!

Ingredients
  

Dough

  • 3 eggs
  • 1 cup sour cream
  • 3 cups all-purpose flour
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 1 Tablespoon baking powder

Potato Filling

  • ½ cup chopped onion
  • 3 Tablespoons butter
  • 1 ½ cups cold mashed potatoes
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon white pepper

Finishing the Pierogi

  • 6 Tablespoons butter melted
  • Sour cream for serving

Instructions
 

  • In a large bowl, beat the eggs and sour cream until smooth.
  • In a separate bowl, whisk the flour, salt, and baking powder together. Add the eggs and sour cream, stirring until the dough starts to come together.
  • Turn the dough out onto a clean surface and knead until smooth. Cover with a damp cloth and let the dough rest for 20 minutes. It can even be refrigerated for up to 48 hours.
  • Divide the dough in half and roll out to ⅛" thickness on a lightly floured surface. Cut into circles with a 3-inch round biscuit cutter.
  • Make the filling by melting the butter in a small pan. Add the chopped onion and saute for 5-7 minutes until soft. Add the onions to the mashed potatoes, stirring to combine.
  • Place about 1 ½ teaspoons of filling in the middle of each round of dough. Use your finger to moisten the edges around half of each round with water, then fold over and seal the edges well by pressing them with your fingers or crimping with a fork.
  • Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add the pierogies, about 10-15 at a time, and cook for 2-3 minutes, until the pierogi float to the top. Remove the cooked pierogi from the water with a slotted spoon and transfer to a plate. Drizzle with 2 tablespoons of the melted butter so they don't stick to each other while you boil the remaining pierogi.
  • Heat a large skillet over medium-high heat and add any remaining butter. Fry the pierogi in batches for 2-3 minutes on each side until golden brown. Serve with sour cream.

Notes

  • Potato & Cheese Pierogi: Make the filling as normal but add 1 ½ cups shredded fontina or cheddar cheese.
  • Sauerkraut filling: 2 tablespoons butter, ⅓ cup chopped onion, 1 ½ cups sauerkraut, drained well and chopped, salt and pepper to taste. Saute onions in the butter for 5 minutes until soft, then add the sauerkraut and cook for 5 minutes more before seasoning with salt and pepper. Cool completely.
  • The finished pierogi are good all sorts of ways, but especially with caramelized onions or sliced and fried kielbasa.
  • You can freeze uncooked pierogi for up to 2 months.
Recipe adapted from AllRecipes.

Nutrition

Calories: 1088kcal | Carbohydrates: 126g | Protein: 23g | Fat: 55g | Saturated Fat: 32g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 3g | Monounsaturated Fat: 14g | Trans Fat: 1g | Cholesterol: 294mg | Sodium: 2045mg | Potassium: 683mg | Fiber: 6g | Sugar: 5g | Vitamin A: 1769IU | Vitamin C: 27mg | Calcium: 390mg | Iron: 8mg
Tried this recipe? Show me on Instagram!Mention @HouseOfNashEats or tag #houseofnasheats!

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About the author

Hi, I'm Amy

I enjoy exploring the world through food, culture, and travel and sharing the adventure with mostly from-scratch, family friendly recipes that I think of as modern comfort cooking.

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Reader questions and reviews

  1. Hi, I'm from Poland and your recipe needs some corrections. First of all, dough - we never add sour cream and baking powder to the dough. I make traditional Polish dough from flour, hot (70-80 degrees) water and vegetable oil. Sometimes you can add an egg but it is not necessary.
    In Poland, we do not eat pierogies only with potatoes. The most popular are Russian pierogi, which are with potatoes, white cheese, onions and a lot of pepper. I know that you cannot buy such white cheese outside of Poland, but you can use ricotta, it will be a little similar. Proportions - 1 cup of mash potato, 1 cup of riccota cheese, 1 stewed chopped onion, salt and at least 1,5 spoon of black pepper.

      1. Yes, you probably are! In many recipe, including this one, you can replace sour cream with buttermilk as they have similar characteristics. I can definitely see how using the same amount of buttermilk in place of the sour cream called for in my version would work well.

  2. The word " pierogi" is plural. Pierogies is singular.
    We add Farmer's cheese with the potatoes on a 1:1 ratio.

  3. Thanks For Sharing this amazing recipe. My family loved it. I will be sharing this recipe with my friends. Hope they will like it.